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David Blacker’s Blog

An Incomplete SL Army Order of Battle for Mullaitivu

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OK, this is the order of battle for the SL Army divisions tooling up for Mullaitivu. I have also included the 53rd and 55th Divisions on the Peninsula, because they’ve been involved in the strategic flanking actions earlier this month, though it’s unlikely they’ll see combat at Mullaitivu. I’ve left out the new Task Force 5, because it’ll be securing the A9, and won’t be used against the Mullaitivu triangle. For divisional positions, please see this map. This order of battle is still incomplete, and may have some errors. If anyone can correct or add to it, please do so via the comment section. Try and include a link that can verify the authenticity of the info if possible.

Disclaimer: All of this info has been gathered by analysing reports and articles available to the public. Continue reading

January 14, 2009 Posted by | War | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

The Advance to Mullaitivu

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Current Situation

The fall of Kilinochchi on January 2nd 2009 (see battle map), was viewed as unexpectedly quick in many sectors. Several military analysts, particularly B Raman and Col Hariharan, were expecting a titanic duel between the SL Army and the LTTE before the latter eventually relinquished their hold on their administrative capital. Even with Task Force 1 poised to take Paranthan by New Year’s Day, and the 57th Division driving into the southern flank of Kilinochchi, the writing on the wall hadn’t been read. With the A9 Highway towns of Paranthan and Iranamadu in SL Army hands, the Tigers risked a double envelopment from both flanks, with brigade-sized units sweeping round to cut off Kilinochchi. The LTTE would have foreseen this danger, and as the flanks crumbled, they withdrew swiftly towards Vaddakachchi in the east. After the heavy fighting on the flanks, the taking of Kilinochchi itself was relatively fast.

Both the 57th Division and TF1 continued the momentum, driving east and northeast of Kilinochchi, pushing the Tigers back so as to prevent an immediate counterattack. Elements of TF1 turned north and fought their way up to the southern edge of Elephant Pass. To the north of Elephant Pass, on the Kilali-Muhamalai-Nagarkovil line, the 53rd and 55th Divisions continued to apply pressure and force the LTTE to commit troops that could be valuable on the mainland.

Meanwhile, on the southern flank, TF2 and TF4 continued to make incremental gains across the A34 Highway linking Mankulam and Mullaitivu, with TF4 taking Oddusuddan on the 5th of January. The 59th Division on the east coast is currently the closest to Mullaitivu, in the Thanniyuttu sector just south of the Kilinochchi lagoon. This is a relatively urban area and the lack of manouver room means that the division cannot use mobility to envelope the defenders as was done in the advances up the northwest coast and across the Kilinochchi District. Any drive into southern Mullaitivu by elements of the 59th will mean slow and bloody fighting against the best of the Tiger units. On January 1st, a day before the fall of Kilinochchi, the 59th got a taste of this as the LTTE’s Ratha Regiment counterattacked and overran the 59th’s forward defence lines before being repulsed. Continue reading

January 8, 2009 Posted by | War | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

   

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