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David Blacker’s Blog

Why I Boycotted the Galle Literary Festival

German university students give the Nazi salute in 1933 as they burn books by Freud, Einstein, Thomas Mann, Jack London, H.G. Wells and many others who were thought to have "un-German" ideas (www.thehistoryplace.com)

Two weeks ago, Reporters sans frontières (RSF), on the instigation of Journalists for Democracy in Sri Lanka (JDS), called for a boycott of the fifth Galle Literary Festival. They sent a petition around, and Noam Chomsky and Arundhati Roy signed up. So did a bunch of other idiots. In it, they called on international authors who had agreed to travel to Sri Lanka to abort their journeys, claiming that it was wrong for literature to be celebrated in a country that killed its journalists. Three authors did; South African Commonwealth Writers Prize winner Damon Galgut, Turkish Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk, and Indian Man Booker winner Kiran Desai. The rest came.

It’s wrong to do many things in a country that kills its journalists. It’s wrong to laugh, it’s wrong to be happy, it’s wrong to have celebrations of any sort. Christmas, Avurudhu, and Valentine’s should be boycotted. But what is right is to celebrate literature. How could the RSF and JDS get this so wrong?

Supporters of the boycott variously claim that the Galle Literary Festival has failed to speak out against the Big Bad Wolf from Madamulana who likes to eat journalists for lunch. Him and his wolfpack of brothers. They say that participants at the festival haven’t done their bit to call attention to the disappearance of cartoonist and columnist Pradeep Eknaligoda, or the murder of Sunday Leader editor Lasantha Wickramatunge, or even the killing of that Tiger, Dharmaratnam Sivaram. Last June, Sri Lanka hosted the International Surfing Association’s Pro 2010 event at Arugam Bay on the island’s east coast, in an area once dominated by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. Well, to paraphrase Colonel Kilgore, Tiger don’t surf, and he’s history now. Over a hundred and twenty international competitors from New Zealand to Germany and from the USA to South Africa participated. No one boycotted that. Next month sees the start of the Cricket World Cup, with Sri Lanka hosting several matches which will be watched by at least a billion fans worldwide. No one has boycotted that either. Perhaps the RSF and JDS think that surfers and cricket fans are too dumb to care about media rights.

But they think book worms are fair game. They think we’re thoughtful, sensitive, bleeding hearted motherfuckers. They think that we live and breathe media rights. That we go to Galle to have a little cry about the poor journos; to sit in little focus groups and figure out how to topple the Bastard at the Trees. Just not enough to suit the JDS and its RSF backers though. So they thought they’d force us; they’d piss in our pool, rain on our parade, crap on our moonstone. Little did they know that just like surfers and cricket fans, most of us are going Down South to meet our idols, drink ourselves silly, and get laid on the beach. Boycott? Fuck that.

JDS and the RSF claim that having an international literature festival would give people the idea that things are all OK in SL now, and we can’t have that can we? Except that this is the fifth year of the Galle Lit, and international authors and their fans have been coming over since 2007 when things were a lot worse than it is now. How does boycotting the festival now say anything? In response, defenders of the Galle Lit claim that the festival was indeed doing its bit to highlight the lack of press freedoms and overall dangers of journalism in Sri Lanka. Er… what? Books, booze, and beaches, machang — the Three B’s — that’s what the GLF is about. No need to apologise for that.

The irony of it all is that many of the people who attend the Galle Literary Festival — both authors and readers — are in fact liberal bleeding hearts who don’t really like the UPFA or the Rajapakse bros. People who have such radical ideas as a secular government, freedom of the press, and — whisper it — D-E-M-O-C-R-A-C-Y. Crazy, westernised, capitalistic, bourgeois running dogs! The JDS sure showed them, eh? You’ll be laughing on the other side of your Galle Fort now.

Well, anyway. As I said at the beginning, three authors bailed. Dalmon Galgut even got to Colombo before doing a U-turn. Orhan Pamuk made excuses about a visa, transparent excuses that are pretty clear if you read the Shyam Selvadurai interview in last Sunday’s papers. Pamuk’s girlfriend, Kiran Desai, didn’t even have an excuse at all other than, I guess, being the girlfriend, and stood by her man. Everyone else showed up and the festival took off like a Jaffna library on fire. Or so I’m told. Because, you see, I wasn’t there. Not because I wanted to boycott the Galle Lit, but because there were so many bookworms, boozers and er… party-goers down in Galle that I couldn’t get a bloody room anywhere between Hikkaduwa and Unawatuna. Apparently more tickets were sold than ever before. Maybe they can organise a boycott every year. Just tell me ahead so that I can book a room and not be fucked I mean boycotted like this time.

For the record, I have participated several times in the Galle Literature Festival as a panelist, and also as a keen fan. I have also been a member of the team that created the festival’s advertising campaign two years running.

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January 31, 2011 - Posted by | government, Literature, Politics | , , , , , , ,

16 Comments »

  1. i wish desai reads this.

    Comment by ggpurple | January 31, 2011 | Reply

  2. I boycotted it too, for similar reasons. Well, along the lines that I couldn’t get there. We’re men of principle DB!

    Comment by RD | January 31, 2011 | Reply

  3. Well said man! :D Three B’s… haha :D

    Comment by Chavie | January 31, 2011 | Reply

  4. Wait. Pamuk is gay. :-D

    Comment by Gazala | January 31, 2011 | Reply

  5. Nice Davy, very nice.

    Comment by DD | January 31, 2011 | Reply

  6. hilarious one david. we get caught too often in either black squares or white. you’ve fucked-that. good man.

    Comment by Malinda Seneviratne | February 1, 2011 | Reply

  7. Hilarious – best comment on the issue so far David.

    If you agree with David, please join the Facebook group for people opposed to the boycott: http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_177552512286865

    The aim is to collect more members than the RSF campaign. Well on the way after one day.

    Comment by Graeme Pietersz | February 1, 2011 | Reply

  8. Good one David. I heard this one was better attended than all the others – so much for the ‘boycott’!!

    Comment by javajones | February 1, 2011 | Reply

  9. Just so you know, one of the GLF boycott organisers, a hack called Antony Loewenstein was ‘honoured’ to participate in the boycott. http://tinyurl.com/6b2s2j4

    Anyone who disagreed with him (including the wet Colombo liberals:) were ‘nationalists’!

    Even better, Loewenstein says ‘well done’ to the pro-LTTE diaspora instigated, Sri Lankan textiles boycott in Europe. That’ll really empower those over-paid girls in garment factories to overthrow the ‘genocidal regime’ (his words), no?

    His Twatter (sic) feed glories in his power and influence. http://tinyurl.com/64p7ow6

    p.s. next time, you should let us know of your accommodation problems in Galle. I could’ve sorted you out with a place in Matara.

    Comment by Mango | February 2, 2011 | Reply

    • Thanks, Mango, I’ll bear it in mind next time.

      Comment by David Blacker | February 5, 2011 | Reply

  10. Hasn’t America done any harm to any journalist?
    Hasn’t Germany, France, UK or any other country done any harm to any journalist?
    And how many journalist speak in public but live without any harm?
    You speak of 0.01% out of hundreds of Sri Lankan journalist who write speak illustrate against the big bad wolf.. What do you have to say about those hundreds of journalists who live without any trouble? Do they bribe the big bad wolf?
    Haven’t these things happened in any other country?

    I’m not a president fan, but I wonder why the whole world scrutinize Sri Lanka and ignore the other big bad wolves.

    When our leader won the war he is a “wolf”.
    Had Prabhakaran won the war what would you call him?? A hero or a wolf?

    Comment by Siththi | February 2, 2011 | Reply

  11. Thumbs up!

    Comment by Bimal | February 3, 2011 | Reply

  12. Totally agree David.. These idiots who boycotted should have been there for the final session at the Lighthouse in Galle where Jung Chang and Jon Halliday discussed their biography of Mao. Pamuk, Galgut and co. would have felt very foolish for bowing to the boycott call. BTW, Galgut and Pamuk’s books were very much on sale at the GLF. Obviously the boycott didnt extend to the marketing of their work!

    Comment by dk | February 4, 2011 | Reply

  13. Great post David… let’s all thumb our noses at the RSF dudes! :)

    Comment by Angel | February 5, 2011 | Reply

  14. [...] print politics in Sri Lanka”. The media release also emphasised that the organisers’ support of RSF’s boycott of the Galle Literary Festival is based on “significantly different ideological [...]

    Pingback by Book burning against Galle Literary Festival to have low carbon foot print « Cerno | January 9, 2012 | Reply


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